Fake justice and the rise of a new religion

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Here is Robert Knight writing at the Washington Times about a new religion:

Post-modern progressives, contrary to popular belief, are not irreligious. They worship at the altar of government power, lifting the chalice of “diversity” and eating the bread of “tolerance.”

Under their arms they carry certain portions of the U.S. Constitution, plus copies of court rulings that are considered sacred and “settled” — but only if they advance progressive notions of progress. All others are open to revision.

For example, progressives have pledged to overturn the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United ruling that recognizes the individual right to collective political speech in unions and nonprofits.

But the same progressives tell us that the Obergefell same-sex “marriage” ruling in 2015 is “settled law” and thus in stone. The same goes for the Roe v. Wade ruling in 1973 that legalized abortion in all 50 states regardless of what happens in state legislatures or at the ballot box.

The progressive divines claim to value individual liberty above all, selectively citing the First Amendment. They ignore altogether the Second Amendment, which they regard as the crazy uncle in the constitutional attic.

Paying lip service, progressives sometimes accord religious liberty a degree of constitutional protection nearly equal to pornography and obscenity, the free exercise of which constitutes an important part of their rites. For anyone paying attention, their cultural agenda has been obvious. Decades ago, C.S. Lewis remarked that the goal of the left is to “make pornography public and religion private.” Except, of course, for the progressive brand. And they are almost there.

Concerning religion itself, progressives draw sharp exceptions. They give a pass to more recent faiths in America such as Islam, for example, while putting public expressions of Christianity and sometimes Judaism, whose tenets constitute America’s foundational values, under a magnifying glass.

Read more: Washington Times

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