Mothers matter. Fathers matter. Biology matters

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Too bad the anti-science (in this case, anti-social science) leftists disagree. Mothers and fathers matter? What a concept. Here is Anna Buhrmann writing at Mercatornet:

The best place for a child to be raised is with biological parents in a stable family

Alanna Newman doesn’t know the man who gave her half of her genetic code. She is a sperm donor baby and has searched for her biological father for years, launching a website called AnonymousUs.org for those affected by donor conception. She’s also written a documentary screenplay in attempt to find him. When asked by an interviewer how her parents felt about her quest, she quietly replies: “They don’t think that my father should matter. They are totally perplexed as to why it would be important.”

Hundreds of thousands of donor-conceived adults and children like Alanna daily face the reality that they may never know one or both of their parents. Yet their feelings of loss and hurt are all too often dismissed. With children born in increasing numbers in unconventional ways, the adults who choose these methods, more often than not, assume that biological parents do not matter to their children.

Melissa Moschella believes they do.

An expert in parental rights and professor of philosophy at the Catholic University of America, she released a book in August 2016 called To Whom Do Children Belong? In it, she skillfully makes the case for the importance of biological parents to their child’s life. The book is a philosophical and grounded discussion answering the question of the title, in no small part as it pertains to public education. Yet, at the heart of the book is the idea that an intimate relationship inescapably exists between biological parent and child. This bond dramatically influences the life of the child, regardless of the presence or absence of the birth parent after conception.

Read more: Mercatornet.com

Image credit:  NadyaEugene / Shutterstock.

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