Phony Divide Between Fiscal & Social Issues

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Phyllis Schlafly is a giant in the history of the conservative movement in America, and her latest column echos what many people have been saying for years regarding “the connection between the economic and social issues“:

Contrary to politicians who want to call a truce about social issues, there is absolutely no way to separate social and fiscal issues; they are locked in a tight political embrace. Politicians who say we can ignore social issues, or avoid talking about them, are really saying that they have no plan to cut federal spending and the growing national debt.

That’s because the social issue of marriage, and its importance to our society, has become a tremendous fiscal issue. The problem of marriage absence is now costing the taxpayers even more than national defense.

We used to have a social structure in the United States where husbands and fathers provided the financial support of wife and children. Last year, 41% of all babies born in the U.S. (including 53% of babies born to women under 30) were illegitimate, growing up without their own fathers.

It is obvious that when the mother of these children has no husband to support her and her babies, she calls on Big Brother Government. You and I then pay the bills for what is labeled welfare. It’s not poverty that causes broken families; it’s the absence of marriage that causes poverty and puts kids below the designated poverty line. Social issues cause fiscal expenses.

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