Foreign/Defense Policy

Notes on the War in Iraq: Why it’s difficult and taking so long

By John Biver

“Ours is the first generation of Americans that thinks it can demand perfection in war. Our present leisure, wealth, and high technology fool us into thinking that we are demi-gods always able to trump both human and natural disasters. Accordingly, we become frustrated that we cannot master every wartime obstacle, as we seem otherwise to be able to do with computers or cosmetic surgery.”

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Notes on the War in Iraq: What is Going Right

By John Biver

“Deposing the Taliban regime still remains the single most important blow that has been struck against the terrorists. And virtually no one could have predicted that a half-decade after the attacks on September 11th, we would not have been hit again. Such things don’t happen by chance.”

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Notes on the War in Iraq: What went wrong

By John Biver

“To solve the mystery of the Iraq War you have to explain how a brilliantly executed invasion turned into a messy counterinsurgency struggle. Part of the explanation, at least, is a lack of troops, a fault for which the Defense Department has been responsible.”

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Notes on the War in Iraq: Since the terrorists target public opinion, so should we

By John Biver

“There is a lot of discussion about the political dynamic in Iraq, but the political dynamic here at home is just as problematic. The United States is at war, and yet our biggest challenge in foreign policy isn’t what’s going on in Iraq. It’s dealing with domestic public opinion here at home that is influenced by the generation that came of age in the 1960s as well as by political celebrities.”

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Baby Boomers, Barack Obama, and War

By John Biver

“Was it moral suasion that made Qaddafi see the wisdom of giving up his weapons of mass destruction? Or Iran agree for the first time to spot nuclear inspections? It was the suasion of…

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